Here are the articles you’ll find in the Summer 2022 issue of the
Journal of Wildlife Photography:

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

I think it’s safe to say that wildlife photography is unlike any other genre of photography. In addition to things like composition, autofocus, exposure, etc., we also need to know how to find and approach our subjects. This means that to be successful at wildlife photography, you must also have basic skills as a naturalist as well. All the latest equipment and technical knowledge in the world will do you no good if you can’t find and approach wildlife.

In this edition of the Journal of Wildlife Photography, you will find a feature article by yours truly called “Zen and the Art of Finding Wildlife.”

It’s not possible to discuss everything there is to know or understand about this topic in a single article. Each situation is different. There is plenty of overlap between how we find and approach different animals, of course. However, the devil is in the details, as they say. Each species, each habitat, each season comes with its own nuances. In the winter, we often use tracks in the snow, for instance. In arid environments, water is a big player. Approaching a sow black bear with cubs is worlds different from approaching a bull moose in rut. Both can kill you. Both will begin communicating with you directly as soon as they see or smell or hear you. And understanding what they are trying to tell you, and what you are telling them, makes all the difference to both your and their safety as well as the photography you create.

To continue reading this article, subscribe below.

ON THE COVER

Story and photo by Jared Lloyd

Having a successful day in the field is often related to our ability to be fluid and pivot when necessary. Success and failure hinge upon our ability to see and anticipate possibilities. And when a situation unfolds, being able to abruptly change gears can mean the difference between coming home with just a bunch of mosquito bites and coming home with memory cards filled with photographs. 

The photograph of the barred owl (Strix varia) on this issue’s cover is a perfect example of this. 

I had pushed away from the dock some 30 minutes before sunrise that morning. Pelican cases filled with camera equipment sat piled near the bow of the boat. Even before sunrise, the temperature was already around 30 degrees Celsius, and the humidity was so thick, I wished I had brought my scuba kit just to breathe the air. Towering bald cypress mixed with swollen tupelo gums, and the whole of the flooded forest before me dripped with Spanish moss.

COMMUNITY CAPTURE
SEA TURTLES AT SUNSET

Story and photos by Leighton Lum

The Journal of Wildlife Photography Facebook group has grown by leaps and bounds in recent months, and every day in this space, wildlife photographers share truly stunning photos from the field. In each issue, we will highlight one or more images that caught the eye of Journal staff along with the photographers’ stories of how they captured and created their photos.

If you haven’t already, join the group! Share photos you’re proud of, and contribute to the community conversation. We’ll see you there.

I love wildlife photography because it involves a test of patience and planning, and even if you have both of these, you still may not get the shot you are after. I love that no two wildlife photos will ever be the same; it’s very hard to replicate wildlife photos, unlike in landscape photography where you can go to the same spot over and over and get really similar images. With wildlife photography, you are capturing a moment in an animal’s life, and that is really special to me.

FEATURE
HUNTING FOR HUMMINGBIRDS

Article and photos by Jason Kazuta

I have been photographing wildlife for about 20 years now, with particular interests in birds and bears. With birds, I am especially interested in hummingbirds and raptors. In my almost two decades of photographing wildlife, I have been privileged to photograph many hummingbirds and also their nests — well-hidden, little moss- and lichen-covered jewels. I live in Vancouver, Canada, and the two most common species of hummingbirds here are the Anna’s (Calypte anna) and the rufous (Selasphorus rufus). Occasionally, you might spot the odd black-chinned (Archilochus alexandri) or calliope (Selasphorus calliope). The Anna’s are year-round residents, while the rufous migrate from down south in Mexico and up as far north as Alaska. The Anna’s will start nesting as early as mid-February, with the rufous coming about a month later.

In 2021, I either found or was informed of 14 nests — 13 Anna’s and one lone rufous, which was a completely fortuitous find for me. Of those 14, only six were in good-enough positions to take good photographs, with the others being too high or in awkward spots (too many branches in the way). You may notice that the number of Anna’s nests I found far outweighs the number of rufous nests. This has always been the case, as Anna’s nests are easier to find compared to rufous nests — at least for me — for reasons discussed below.

SPECIES OF SPECIAL CONCERN WATER, WINGS, AND WETLANDS

Article and photos by Alyce Bender

Pre-dawn stop at the 7-Eleven for some caffeine and the last bathroom for the next five to six hours. It is cold, especially for South Texas. Ice warnings have been announced, and I’m bundled up as if I were much farther north of the equator than I actually am. The combination of cold, wind, and high humidity makes the cold seem much worse than the actual numbers on the car’s thermometer would have one believe.

Shouldering my camera pack, I am warmly greeted by the captain of the small shallow-draft cabined boat that will take a few dedicated photographers, including myself, out into the bay and along the outlying islands of Aransas National Wildlife Refuge. We are all anticipating the chance to have a close-up encounter with North America’s tallest bird and the rarest crane on the planet: the whooping crane!

SOUTHERN EXPOSURES
THE SPOTTED HYENA

Article and photos by Joe McDonald

Cowardly. Sniveling. Sneaky. Conniving, and more. OK, blame a certain kids’ movie for this popular view, and misconception, toward Africa’s second-largest predator. The spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta) gets a bad rap, and I’d like to rehabilitate that reputation.

True, spotted hyenas might appear to deserve a jaundiced view, at least on first glance. On an African safari, your encounters with hyenas may not show the animals to their best advantage. Often, their fur looks matted and soiled, as hyenas love to soak in water and sometimes wallow in mud. If not muddy and wet, a hyena may be coated in blood, the result of dining on a fresh kill or burrowing deep inside a carcass for choice bits. And, of course, you may see hyenas gathered around a lion kill, waiting to claim or steal the hard-won meal of the noble big cats. Or so you think!

Let’s correct that last statement first, and that correction illustrates how knowing your subject, whether that is the “lowly” hyena or a coyote, skunk, spider, or snake (all often reviled and persecuted), can give you greater appreciation for, and motivation to photograph, species that some would otherwise ignore.

SET UP FOR SUCCESS
TAKE TO THE WATER!

Article and photos by Ruth Hoyt

Summer is upon us in the Northern Hemisphere, and temperatures are steadily rising. The thought of going outside in the oppressive heat to photograph doesn’t tempt most folks, but I’m not most folks. One of my solutions for dealing with summertime heat is to photograph from a float-tube blind in the water. That just sounds like, “Ahhhhhh! Cool!”

I live in a very dusty, sandy, windy, humid, desert-but-subtropical environment, so my cameras are always at least a little bit dirty. Why not add yet another risk element — water! — to the formula for the “enemy” of my camera?

I risk getting my cameras wet while photographing because I enjoy aiming for incredible photos of birds in and near the water. My cameras and tripods are tools of the trade; I take care of them the best I can, but I’m not afraid to use them in tricky situations to acquire the photos I want.

FEATURE
ZEN AND THE ART OF FINDING WILDLIFE

Article and photos by Jared Lloyd

I’m in Florida in the southeastern United States, and it’s hot as hell. After months of winter in Yellowstone and the boreal forest of Minnesota, landing here along the Gulf Coast, with the heat and sun and humidity levels so high that the locals are walking their goldfish on leashes, means my body is struggling to catch up. Along the white sandy beaches of pulverized limestone, the breeze that rolls in off the Gulf of Mexico is paradisical. The waters this time of year dry out the air. But I’m not on the beach. I’m inland. And I’m searching for owls. 

This stretch of the Gulf Coast is where things begin to transition from subtropical to tropical. Technically, that’s not true. The tropics begin and end with very specific latitudes known as the Tropic of Cancer and the Tropic of Capricorn — otherwise known as 23.5 degrees north and 23.5 degrees south of the equator. I’m at 27 degrees north, a long way off from the Tropic of Cancer. But that great thermal mass we call the Gulf of Mexico, with an average temperature of 27 degrees Celsius, allows for a strange glimpse into another world. 

DID YOU KNOW?
RED-BILLED TROPICBIRD

Article by Danielle Phillippi | Photo by Jared Lloyd

Effortlessly graceful in the air, red-billed tropicbirds (Phaethon aethereus) distinguish themselves from other pelagic seabirds with their elongated tail streamers and red bills. Their genus name comes from Ancient Greek, meaning “the shining one,” while their Latin species name means “heavenly” or “of the sky.”

Like all tropicbirds, they spend much of their time gliding over open seas and can reach speeds upwards of 40 kilometers per hour in flight, but their evolution that has made them so at home in the sky and on the water has made them completely ungainly on land due to feeble, awkwardly positioned feet. However, they can also be seen plunge-diving for small fish and squid and performing elaborate courtship displays of aerial acrobatics that showcase their natural elegance.

To gain access to these articles in the Journal of Wildlife Photography as well as all back issues and articles, plus our extensive video library, subscribe below:

Annual Membership

$ 97 first year
  • One-year subscription to the Journal of Wildlife Photography
  • Instant access to 4+ years of back issues
  • Every issue is packed with at least 50 to 100+ pages of in-depth articles to bring you workshop-level information about wildlife photography for any level
  • Instant access to our video library and post-processing techniques in Lightroom and Photoshop specifically for wildlife photography
  • Weekly wildlife photography tips in your inbox
  • Automatic registration to win a spot on our workshop + equipment giveaways
  • 100+ in-depth articles on wildlife ecology, shooting tips, field techniques, and more
  • 100% online with multiple formats, plus you can download a PDF version so you'll never be without the Journal even when you don't have internet access

Lifetime Membership

$ 297 one-time
  • Lifetime subscription to the Journal of Wildlife Photography
  • Instant access to 4+ years of back issues
  • Every issue is packed with at least 50 to 100+ pages of in-depth articles to bring you workshop-level information about wildlife photography for any level
  • Instant access to our video library and post-processing techniques in Lightroom and Photoshop specifically for wildlife photography
  • Weekly wildlife photography tips in your inbox
  • Automatic registration to win a spot on our workshop + equipment giveaways
  • 100+ in-depth articles on wildlife ecology, shooting tips, field techniques, and more
  • 100% online with multiple formats, plus you can download a PDF version so you'll never be without the Journal even when you don't have internet access
  • Lifetime access to the Journal of Wildlife Photography
  • Pay once and never have to think about it again!​
  • 15% off all future purchases​
  • FREE BONUS #1: eBook – “Mastering Light: The Essence of Wildlife Photography” ($97 Value)​
  • FREE BONUS #2: eBook – “The Photographer's Guide To The Outer Banks” ($49 value)​
BEST VALUE
Logo-1000

Copyright 2021 | All Rights Reserved | Journal of Wildlife Photography
1627 W. Main St. #407, Bozeman, MT 59715 | Refund Policy | Privacy Policy